Nashville nurse sentenced to 1-year probation, then conviction expunged, for criminally negligent homicide.

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New details have been released in the homicide case of a man who paid a Nashville nurse to inject him with methamphetamine over a period several months, eventually causing his death due to an overdose. December’s DAR (Disciplinary Action Report), released by the State of Tennessee Department of Health, gives details previously only known to authorities and the Grand Jury that indicted him.

New details show the 45-year-old nurse, Jason P. Faith, was paid by the victim, 55-year-old John Wireman, to inject him with methamphetamine over a period of several months. This ‘service’ started in January of 2017, and continued until April 28th, 2017, when the victim died due to ‘acute combined multiple drug intoxication’ (GHB & Methamphetamine), according to the coroner.

Nearly a month after the man’s death, on May 23, 2017, nurse Jason Faith admitted to a Metro Police Detective during an interview that he had been assisting Wireman with injections of methamphetamine, including on the day of his death.

Jason Faith (MNPD)

Faith admitted that Wireman payed him $200.00 per month in return for giving Wireman injections of methamphetamine. Faith also admitted to injecting B.C., a friend of Wireman, with methamphetamine multiple times in the month of April 2017.

On August 30, 2018, Jason Faith appeared in a Nashville Court in front of Judge Steve Dozier, charged with the Grand Jury indictment of reckless homicide, reading “Jason Perry Faith did recklessly kill John Wireman”. A plea agreement had already been reached and was presented to the court, which would allow Faith to plead ‘nolo contendere’ to ‘criminally negligent homicide’ under a Judicial Diversion order. This order allowed Faith to serve 12 months of supervised probation, and forfeit his nursing license. At the end of 12 months, all charges will be expunged from his record, assuming he doesn’t commit any other serious felonies during that time.

Eight months from now, in August of 2019, Faith will have a freshly expunged record, with no proof that he killed a man by receiving money to inject him with methamphetamine.

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