MNPD isn’t apologizing for arresting citizens on a felony charge repealed 2 years ago

Metro Nashville Police Public Affairs Manager Don Aaron says Officer Ronald Bright “acted in good faith” when, in June of 2021, he arrested a citizen and charged with them with felony “habitual motor offender”, a law that was repealed by the state legislature over two years ago which carried a punishment of up to 6 years in prison. A magistrate even signed the warrant, jailed the citizen, and required them to post a large cash bond to get out of jail – on a charge that no longer existed. Scoop: Nashville learned this scenario has played out over 20 times in the last 17 months, leaving citizens at a loss for the money spent for high cash bond amounts, towing/storage fees, public humiliation, lost wages & jobs, and other expenses due to the invalid arrests.

Woman throws water bottle at boyfriend’s head when he attempts to walk away during an argument.

29-year-old Marisa Petrillo is charged with domestic assault with bodily injury after admitting to police that she threw a water bottle at her boyfriend, bruising the side of his head and causing him to tumble down a flight of stairs, after he attempted to walk away from her during an argument.

‘Brother Jones’ says he wasn’t violent, but new video shows he was – and the Grand Jury agrees

Protestor Justin Jones (“Brother Jones”) was given two weeks to turn himself in on a Grand Jury Indictment, which charges him with two counts of reckless endangerment after he is seen on video repeatedly pushing a traffic cone into the cab of a vehicle, striking the person inside, and causing a danger to both the driver and the nearby public.

Jones claims this is a ‘false narrative’, and says he wasn’t violent. Here’s the video.

Nashville ADA fired over facebook post; co-worker offended on behalf of ‘white police officer son’

Glenn Funk demanded the resignation of his first male Latino ADA, Cesar Arbelaez, after he made a social media post regarding police reform that offended a co-worker who said he should consider the effect on their “white police officer son”. Albelaez refused to resign; Glenn Funk fired him.

Nashville District Attorney announces new policy on marijuana prosecutions

Nashville District Attorney Glenn Funk’s office has announced that effective today, they will no longer prosecute individuals for possession of less than a half-ounce of marijuana.

Charges against former MNPD Officer accused of stomping child, assaulting officer, all dismissed/deferred

A 52-year-old retired Metro Cop had all charges, including a felony, dismissed or deferred by the D.A. despite police alleging he assaulted his daughters, stomped one in the stomach, attacked an officer when he fled from them, attempted to take a taser, and refused all commands to drop to the ground. The will all be eligible for expungement.

D.A.’s office will prosecute passenger, but not off-duty officer, on identical charge

Today marks the point of no return for the Nashville District Attorney’s Office. Today is the day they define two clear and distinct paths for prosecuting crimes in Nashville – one for police, and one for citizens.
Two people in the same car got charged with identical crimes. One was an off-duty cop, whose charges the D.A. refused to prosecute. The passenger, a citizen with no priors, will be prosecuted in a Nashville courtroom this morning at 9 a.m. by the same D.A.’s office, for the same charge.

22 CoreCivic protest arrests: No prosecutions by D.A., despite Police Chief’s demand for consequences

Metro Police arrested 22 people during a CoreCivic protest in August, and Police Chief Anderson demanded “corresponding and commensurate consequences” in an unusually heated statement about the incident. The District Attorney’s Office has now decided NONE of the cases will be prosecuted, and can now be expunged, despite the Chief’s wishes.